Lambeth North Deanery

Angell Town, St John the Evangelist

External photo

Address

Wiltshire Road
Brixton
London
SW9 7NE

Location map

Parish Contacts

Rev Rosemarie Mallet (Vicar)

St John's Vicarage,
49 Wiltshire Road,
London SW9 7NE

Tel: 020-7733 0585
E-mail: rosemarie.mallett@btinternet.com

Sunday Services

10.30 am Parish Mass

Facilities: Disabled access, toilets

Further details of all Sunday and weekday services and activities may be obtained from the parish contacts

Information

Tradition: Modern Catholic
Patron: Bishop of Southwark

Population (2001 census): 9,524
Urban Priority Area: Yes

Deanery: Lambeth North
Archdeaconry: Lambeth
Episcopal Area: Kingston
Diocesan Record Office: London Metropolitan Archives

Introduction to parish

The parish of St John, Angell Town, Brixton, consists almost entirely of five large housing estates.

The church was built in 1852-3, designed by Benjamin Ferrey in the Perpendicular style. After war damage, a fire in 1947 and subsequent reconstruction, there was a long period of neglect.

A successful fundraising programme has enabled repair work to take place on the building to restore it to full use for worship. The building was rededicated in 2002. A Neighbourhood Nursery, offering affordable childcare for children aged 0-5, has been developed in the formerly derelict East End of the building. This project is a three way partnership between the church, St John's Church of England Primary School, and Christian Victory Group. It was one of the projects supported by the Bishop of Southwark's Lent Call in 2004.

Details of church

Internal photo

Internal photo

Built: 1852 - 53
Architect: Benjamin Ferrey
Listing: grade 2

The church was built in 1852 - 53, with renovation in 1877 and addition of a Parish Room to the north side of the chancel in 1882. It is built in the Perpendicular style and has a tall west tower with corner pinnacles and chequered battlements. The building is a brick structure faced in Kentish Rag with Bath Stone dressings. The roofs are slated. Internally the nave is divided from the aisles by arcades with octagonal piers and clerestory windows above.

The church was badly damaged by fire in 1947, following which the church was divided. The nave up to the chancel arch was retained for worship and the chancel, less its north wall, rebuilt as a separate hall.

After a long period of neglect, the building became unusable for worship, except during the summer months. A successful fundraising programme has enabled repair work to take place on the building to restore it to full use for worship. A Neighbourhood Nursery, offering affordable childcare for children aged 0-5, has been developed in the formerly derelict East End of the building.